Friday, March 01, 2013

How to Use the Secret of Green in a Painting


'Nantucket Greens'         8x10          pastel     ©Karen Margulis
click here to purchase $125

First layers with oranges and violets on orange paper
I've been thinking a lot about painting green lately.  My recent pastel acquisition included several set with a lot of green pastels.  I've blogged about the Marsha Savage set of Terry Ludwig pastels and The Albert Handell Unison set and the Terry Ludwig assorted greens.

So I have plenty of green pastels and plenty of green things to paint in Georgia. How can I make my green paintings more interesting?  I could use Albert Handell's suggestion to balance greens with mauves. Read about it here.  I can use Richard McKinley's secret to green.  If you would like to read more about his secret you can see my post here. He also has an excellent book 'Pastel Pointers' which is a must have for pastelists.

Plein air painting I did during a Richard McKinley workshop in Hope Valley CA


For today's painting I used both recommendations.  It is good to know these 'secrets' but the trick is learning how to actually use them in a painting!  I decided it would be more fun to demonstrate than to try to explain So today's Friday Feature You Tube video will answer the question. I hope you enjoy the video!


6 comments:

Olga Díaz said...

Karen, estoy encantada de encontrar tu blog, es realmente interesante y me sirve de gran ayuda, muchas gracias por compartir.
Saludos desde Espeña.

Dorothy said...

Karen, I am loving your weekly videos! Thank you for sharing the greens tip...here is the NW we also have an abundance of green! I have heard them before, but it is so nice to see you actually do a quick demo of the way you handle it. Thank you!

pattisjarrett said...

I'm so glad to have found your blog. I learn something new every day. Thanks for the video "how-to."

Marie Marfia said...

Great video! I always learn so much from you. Thanks for posting. Watching your quick demo was especially helpful.

Karen said...

Thank you everyone for your comments! I really appreciate your feedback!!
I

Suzanne said...

Very useful! Seeing the practical application of the theory was very helpful. Oddly enough, the most useful thing was to see the broad stroke application of the hues in the underpainting. I tend to add a little here, and a little there, and it takes way too long to get an underpainting to come together. My touch is light, so broad strokes of layered hues will work for me.

May I suggest a soft, indirect light for your face while in front of the camera?